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Event: Panel Discussing the Life and Legacy of EM

This panel, held in conjunction with a solo presentation of the artist's work curated by Carroll Dunham and Dan Nadel at CANADA, is moderated by writer Linda Yablonsky and will discuss Murray’s art, life and legacy with artists Yevgeniya Baras, Deborah Kass, Suzanne Mcclelland, Kianja Strobert, Judy Hudson, and Pat Steir. Sat, Jan 14 @ 4pm CANADA, 333 Broome Street, NYC RSVP: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/elizabeth-murray-a-panel-discussion-tickets-30809170057 This event is present by Estate of Elizabeth Murray in collaboration with CANADA. Throughout her four-decade career Elizabeth Murray (1940-2007) redefined the world of painting by producing a singularly innovative body of work. Warping, twisting, and knotting her constructed canvases, she transformed painting's conventions with her vivid colors, boldly inventive forms, and shaped, constructed, multi-paneled canvases. Murray’s work often featured domestic objects—coffee cups, glasses, spoons, chairs, tables, and shoes—by which the artist subverts the viewer's notion of the familiar. Stoically, she plowed through the male-dominated art world to make way for her art and by doing so, cleared a way for a generation of women artists. Image: Elizabeth Murray with "Dis Pair" 1989-90, now in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo: Barry Cornbluh courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery Archives

This panel, held in conjunction with a solo presentation of the artist's work curated by Carroll Dunham and Dan Nadel at CANADA, is moderated by writer Linda Yablonsky and will discuss Murray’s art, life and legacy with artists Yevgeniya Baras, Deborah Kass, Suzanne Mcclelland, Kianja Strobert, Judy Hudson, and Pat Steir.

Sat, Jan 14 @ 4pm
CANADA, 333 Broome Street, NYC
RSVP: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/elizabeth-murray-a-panel-discussion-tickets-30809170057

This event is present by Estate of Elizabeth Murray in collaboration with CANADA.

Throughout her four-decade career Elizabeth Murray (1940-2007) redefined the world of painting by producing a singularly innovative body of work. Warping, twisting, and knotting her constructed canvases, she transformed painting's conventions with her vivid colors, boldly inventive forms, and shaped, constructed, multi-paneled canvases. Murray’s work often featured domestic objects—coffee cups, glasses, spoons, chairs, tables, and shoes—by which the artist subverts the viewer's notion of the familiar. Stoically, she plowed through the male-dominated art world to make way for her art and by doing so, cleared a way for a generation of women artists.

Image: Elizabeth Murray with "Dis Pair" 1989-90, now in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo: Barry Cornbluh courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery Archives